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MOST EXPENSIVE PINK DIAMONDS SOLD AT AUCTIONS

 A 59.60 carat pink oval diamond called "Pink Star" was sold in April 2017 at Sotheby's in Australia for a record $ 71.2 million ($ 1194600 / carat). The diamond had a preliminary value of $ 60 million. The unique stone was acquired by the Australian jewelry company Chow Tai Fook (CTF), which renamed the diamond “CTF Pink diamond” in honor of the brand's name. The gemstone has excellent quality characteristics. The color of this diamond is Fancy Vivid Pink by the Gemological Institute of America, and IF is clarity. This diamond is classified as a rare type IIa. It was cut from a 132.5 carat diamond mined by De Beers in 1999 in Australia. 

It took about 20 months to cut the stone. For the first time this diamond, under its old name "Steinmetz Pink", was shown to the public in Australia in 2003. This diamond was previously exhibited at Sotheby's in November 2013 in Geneva. Then he left for a record $ 83 million. But at the end of February 2014 it became known that the buyer could not pay for the diamond and the Sotheby's auction bought the stone for himself for $ 72 million. At the moment (December 2019), this is the largest and most expensive Pink diamond sold at the auction. Also CTF Pink Star is the most expensive gem in the world ever sold at auction.

An 18.46 carat emerald cut bright pink "Pink Legacy" diamond was sold in November 2018 at Christie's in Geneva for US $ 50.3 million ($ 2,700,000 / carat). Estimate of the stone was 30-50 million dollars. The buyer of the jewelry was the Swatch Group, which owns the Harry Winston jewelry brand. The stone was given a new name in honor of the jeweler Harry Winston - "The Winston Pink Legacy". Diamond color - Fancy Vivid Pink, clarity - VS1.

The diamond from which this Pink diamond was cut was mined around 1918 in South Africa and belonged to the Oppenheimer family, which owned the De Beers diamond mining company. The stone was finished in 1920. Winston's Pink Heritage diamond set a record price per carat for pink diamonds, which still (as of December 2019) has not been broken - $ 2.7 million / carat.

A 24.78-carat, rectangular, stepped-cut, rounded pink diamond was sold in November 2010 at Sotheby's in Australia for $ 46.1 million ($ 1,860,000 / carat). The preliminary cost estimate of the stone was US $ 27-38 million. The new owner of the diamond was the famous jeweler Laurence Graff, who gave the nameless stone the name "The Graff Pink". Stone color - Fancy Intense Pink (fancy intense pink), clarity - VVS2. A report on the stone from the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) also reported that a diamond could potentially have a higher clarity FL if re-cut, while eliminating minor defects that would affect clarity ratings. The diamond was also classified as a rare physical type IIa.

The history of this unique stone can only be traced back to the middle of the last century. It is not known for certain where and when the Pink diamond was mined and cut. The first famous owner of the diamond was jeweler Harry Winston, who sold it to a private collector about 70 years ago. From then until this auction in 2010, the stone has never been put up for auction. It is now known that Lawrence Graff re-cut the acquired "The Graff Pink"... The new value of the stone mass is 23.88 carats, the loss was only 0.90 carats. 

At the same time, the risk of re-cutting the most expensive stone (at that time) sold at the auction proved to be justified. The new GIA re-cut stone certificate now lists a more valuable color, Fancy Vivid Pink, and has a clear IF. According to some estimates, the value of a jewel with such updated characteristics has increased by more than $ 10 million. In 2010-2017. this diamond was the most expensive pink diamond sold at the auction.

A large cushion-shaped Pink diamond "The Princie" weighing 34.65 carats was sold in April 2013 in New York at Christie's for $ 39.3 million ($ 1,135,000 / carat). Estimate was 20-30 million dollars. An anonymous collector became the buyer of the stone. Stone color - Fancy Intense Pink (fancy intense pink), clarity - VS2. It is also a rare type IIa diamond. The diamond from which the "Little Prince" was cut was mined over 300 years ago at the famous diamond mines of Golconda in India. 

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